Books by Stan Goldberg

Stan Goldberg, PhD
Loving, Supporting, and Caring for the Cancer Patient: A Guide to Communication, Compassion, and Courage

Loving, Supporting, and Caring for the Cancer Patient

A Guide to Communication, Compassion, and Courage

At least once in your life someone will say to you, “I have cancer,” and when she says the three words, you may struggle with a response. If a loved one or friend hasn’t informed you of a cancer diagnosis, it’s only a matter of time until they will. Every year fourteen million people worldwide learn they are living with or may die from this insidious illness. The uncertainty of cancer causes anxiety in those diagnosed and feelings of inadequacy in loved ones and friends who want to help.

When someone says “I have cancer,” what will you say? More importantly, what will you do? In Loving, Supporting, and Caring for the Cancer Patient, readers will learn specific ways of going beyond the response “I’m so sorry,” and practical behaviors that will ease a loved one or friend’s journey. They range from being specific immediately after a diagnosis, to honoring their loved one or friend at the moment of passing.

Based on Stan Goldberg’s own cancer journey, thirty years of counseling and coaching people living with cancer and their loved ones, and as a bedside volunteer in four hospices over eight years, the book is filled with poignant accounts of clients and patients, personal reflections, and age-old stories filled with infinite wisdom.

Leaning into Sharp Points by Stan Goldberg

Leaning into Sharp Points

Practical Guidance and Nurturing Support for Caregivers

Whether you’re coping with a loved one who has received a terminal diagnosis, has a long-term illness or disability, or suffers with dementia, caregiving is challenging and crucial. Those who face this responsibility, whether occasionally or 24/7, are brushing up against life’s sharpest point.

In this book, Stan Goldberg offers an honest, caring, and comprehensive guide to those on this journey. Everyone wants to “do the right thing,” and this book provides the often-elusive how-to; from bedside etiquette to advice on initiating difficult conversations, caring for oneself while caring for another, navigating rapid changes in your loved one’s condition, and even offering “permission” for them to die.

Goldberg’s stories demonstrate how to address the most difficult topics and will facilitate more open and useful communication and caregiving.

Lessons for the Living: Stories of Forgiveness, Gratitude, and Courage at the End of Live, by Stan Goldberg

Lessons for the Living

Stories of Forgiveness, Gratitude, and Courage at the End of Life

Whether you’re coping with a loved one who has received a terminal diagnosis, has a long-term illness or disability, or suffers with dementia, caregiving is challenging and crucial. Those who face this responsibility, whether occasionally or 24/7, are brushing up against life’s sharpest point.

In this book, Stan Goldberg offers an honest, caring, and comprehensive guide to those on this journey. Everyone wants to “do the right thing,” and this book provides the often-elusive how-to; from bedside etiquette to advice on initiating difficult conversations, caring for oneself while caring for another, navigating rapid changes in your loved one’s condition, and even offering “permission” for them to die.

Goldberg’s stories demonstrate how to address the most difficult topics and will facilitate more open and useful communication and caregiving.

I have Cancer: “I Have Cancer” 48 Things to Do When You Hear Those Words

“I Have Cancer”

48 Things to Do When You Hear Those Words

At least once in your life someone will say to you, “I have cancer,” and when these three words are spoken, you may struggle with a response. Twenty years ago a good friend informed me she had breast cancer. I didn’t know if I should be upbeat (telling her she would defeat it) or just hug her and say how sorry I was. I did what most people do. I said, “I’m so sorry,” a safe answer but not necessarily a helpful one.

Twelve years ago it was my turn. “You have prostate cancer,” the urologist said. “And it’s aggressive.” I don’t remember what I said to him, but I still become nauseous thinking of his four words. I was fifty-seven then. Death was still something theoretical, something that happened to other people– people of my parent’s generation.

Throughout my service to people living and dying from cancer, I heard that although they wanted to share their diagnosis, they were concerned how friends and loved ones would react. Often when they said, “I have cancer,” there was an awkward silence accompanied by a painful expression.

The purpose of this book is to help loved ones and friends understand what we are experiencing and what they can do to help us on our journey. You will learn 48 things to do that will support your loved one or friend on this unsettling journey you both will travel. The suggestions range from the simplicity of compassionate listening to the gut-wrenching preparation for death.

Best Buddhist Writing 2010

Excerpt from Lessons for the Living was chosen as the lead chapter.

Counseling in Communication Disorders
Final chapter on end of life issues in major counseling book in communicative disorders.
Ready to Learn

A book that can help parents enable their children to learn better and easier, regardless of their child’s learning style.

Clinical Skills

Comprehensive look at clinical skills; not only for speech language pathologists but any professional trying to change clients attitudes or behaviors.

Stuttering Therapy

This professional book is for speech-language pathologists who specialize in stuttering therapy. It offers a differential diagnosis for disfluency and a unique approach to therapy.

The Power of Purpose
This book contains the 19 winning essays from more than 8,000 entries in John Tempelton’s Power of Purpose worldwide essay contest. Stan Goldberg’s essay, “Fixing? Helping? Serving? appears in the book.
Personal Growth and Behavior

A chapter on 10 universal rules of change developed by Goldberg appears in this book. It was originally an article in Psychology Today.